Posts tagged with "Cooking"

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    Waste Not, Want Not: Most Googled Leftover Recipes

    Lockdown helped to turn many a kitchen shy-away into a culinary connoisseur but honing these budding skills means that we need to learn to get creative with our leftovers. The question is, how?

    While eating out may be back on the menu, many of us are still loving using our newfound talents to cook up some homemade delights in our kitchens. But how do we make the most of our leftovers?

    We’ve all fallen prey to the common kitchen faux pas of accidentally boiling enough pasta to serve a family of four or baking an ever-rising loaf that would feed the five thousand – but with food sharing being a no-no at the moment, this new generation of Nigellas have been busy cooking up a storm with their leftovers.

    As lockdown came into play in March, we immediately saw social media flooded with mouth-watering snaps of new and ingenious kitchen concoctions. From recipes made with leftover bread to more complicated creations like leftover lamb biryani, we wanted to discover what us Brits had been craving the most.

    Our research method

    Armed with a list of the UK’s most popular foods, we used Google search data to discover which ingredients have become regulars in our kitchens throughout the peak months of lockdown: from March to July. Here’s what we found – it might surprise you…

    The most searched for leftover ingredients of 2020

    With a staggering combined result of just under a million searches, it’s clear the UK remains a nation of meat lovers. Perhaps unsurprisingly though, chicken is the most popular choice, with a grand total of 424,250 searches. This versatile meat is a healthy family favourite and works well in many dishes, but what’s the nation’s favourite way to serve up leftover chicken?

    Coming in at an additional 1,200 searches compared to the same time last year, a classic chicken soup is the dish that we’ve had a hankering for the most. Through the sweltering summer days and week-long downpours, a comforting soup is just what we’ve been craving whilst we were stuck indoors.

    Another popular craving – and next on the list of the most searched-for ingredients – is bread. With ample spare time on our hands at the beginning of lockdown, a baking craze swept the nation and we saw supermarket shelves being emptied of flour, eggs and other baking ingredients.

    As food and cooking was undoubtedly a highlight of our lockdown days, many of us were pushing our culinary limits and creating two or even three-course meals. And with an extra 4,050 searches compared to 2019, a whole host of us were wondering what starters to make with our leftover sourdough.

    The most googled vegetarian ingredients

    The rising popularity of vegetarianism has had a noticeable impact on the content of our fridges and recipes. Our data revealed that vegetarian recipes have seen a 334K rise in searches during lockdown – but which veggie-friendly ingredients have the nation worked into these recipes?

    It seems that 2020 is the year Brits reverted back to more traditional cupboard staples, with more exotic options like pinto beans, refried beans and masa seeing fewer searches than last year. Our analysis revealed that, during lockdown, we cooked with more local veg, with cabbage being the most sought-after ingredient, followed closely by beans, spinach, and carrots.

    Perhaps due to the nationwide banana bread obsession of March and April, bananas are the most searched for fruit so far this year, followed by tomatoes (believe it or not, they’re a fruit!) and strawberries.

    The most searched-for leftover ingredients 2020 vs 2019

    With ingredients like chicken, potatoes, and cabbage back in favour, it seems that the traditional Sunday dinner will never go out of style.

    In 2020, we collectively started to embrace a more traditional palette. And when you think about serving up a steaming bowl of homemade chicken soup with a crusty slice of freshly made bread, you hardly need to wonder why.

    Have you become a fully-fledged kitchenista during 2020? We’d love to hear from you!

    If you’d like to spruce up your kitchen, look no further than our range of kitchens to suit all styles. With a choice of modern and traditional options, from kitchen cabinets to counter tops, you can work with our skilled team of designers to create the kitchen of your dreams.

    Category: Cooking

  • Seasons Eatings

    With people becoming more aware of the environmental impact day to day activities can have we are striving to make more conscious decisions in the ways we do things. However, one of the biggest changes we can make may be hidden right under our noses.

    One small change, with a great effect, can be changing our buying habits and eating seasonally. Walking into our local supermarket, we will often take for granted the food on offer, but have you ever considered the impact that buying your fruit and veg out of season may have?

    We looked at where exactly our fruit and veg is travelling from and the heafty airmiles that are being put in for the luxury.

    But do you think you’d be able to say what’s in season when? To find out we’ve surveyed 2,000 individuals, to see if they knew what’s in season when and the impact that eating their asparagus in summer or their courgettes at Christmas might be having.  8 out of 10 said that they have shopped seasonally, or would like to. But, when we put them to the test only 3 out of 10 knew when common fruits and vegetables were in season.

    Ever thought what your dinner table would look like if you only ate seasonally? We’ve put together a helpful guide so you can see what’s in season year-round so you can plan your shopping to suit.

    Having a seasonal diet and eating produce grown closer to home means we can reduce carbon emmissions and eat sustainably. We found that the UK imported 30% of all the food from the EU in 2017 and that grapes rack up the largest air miles at 6011. 26% of all carbon emissions come from food production and consumption with potatoes having the highest carbon footprint of any vegetable, at 2.9kg of CO2 per kg of potato. Despite these stats, only 28% of people choose to each seasonally to help lower their carbon footprint.

    Inspired to start eating seasonally? Check out our blog for more food and kitchen inspiration and for the best in kitchen design, head over to our kitchen planner.

    Category: Cooking